Thursday, July 14, 2016

It's July!



July isn't as popular of month for spreading awareness, but Bravelets is highlighting one cause this month: Juvenile Arthritis.

I have gathered some information about the cause below from the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Disease. We also have Brave Page fundraisers benefitting Arthritis that you can check out.




Who Gets Juvenile Arthritis?

Juvenile arthritis affects children of all ages and ethnic backgrounds. About 294,000 American children under age 18 have arthritis or other rheumatic conditions.

What Causes Juvenile Arthritis?

Juvenile arthritis is usually an autoimmune disorder. As a rule, the immune system helps fight off harmful bacteria and viruses. But in an autoimmune disorder, the immune system attacks some of the body’s healthy cells and tissues. Scientists don’t know why this happens or what causes the disorder. Some think it’s a two-step process in children: something in a child’s genes (passed from parents to children) makes the child more likely to get arthritis, and something like a virus then sets off the arthritis.

What Are the Symptoms and Signs of Juvenile Arthritis?

The most common symptoms of juvenile arthritis are joint swelling, pain, and stiffness that doesn’t go away. Usually it affects the knees, hands, and feet, and it’s worse in the morning or after a nap. Other signs include:
  • Limping in the morning because of a stiff knee
  • Excessive clumsiness
  • High fever and skin rash
  • Swelling in lymph nodes in the neck and other parts of the body.
Most children with arthritis have times when the symptoms get better or go away (remission) and other times when they get worse (flare).
Arthritis in children can cause eye inflammation and growth problems. It also can cause bones and joints to grow unevenly.

How Do Doctors Find Out if Your Child Has Juvenile Arthritis?

There is no easy way a doctor can tell if your child has juvenile arthritis. Doctors usually suspect arthritis when a child has constant joint pain or swelling, as well as skin rashes that can’t be explained and a fever along with swelling of lymph nodes or inflammation in the body’s organs. To be sure that it is juvenile arthritis, doctors depend on many things, which may include:
  • Physical exam
  • Symptoms
  • Family history
  • Lab tests
  • X rays.

Who Treats Juvenile Arthritis?

A team approach is the best way to treat juvenile arthritis. It is best if a doctor trained to treat these types of diseases in children (a pediatric rheumatologist) manages your child’s care. However, many children’s doctors and “adult” rheumatologists also treat children with arthritis.
Other members of your child’s health care team may include:
  • Physical therapist
  • Occupational therapist
  • Counselor or psychologist
  • Eye doctor
  • Dentist and orthodontist
  • Bone surgeon
  • Dietitian
  • Pharmacist
  • Social worker
  • Rheumatology nurse
  • School nurse.

How Is Juvenile Arthritis Treated?

Doctors who treat arthritis in children will try to make sure your child can remain physically active. They also try to make sure your child can stay involved in social activities and have an overall good quality of life. Doctors can prescribe treatments to reduce swelling, maintain joint movement, and relieve pain. They also try to prevent, identify, and treat problems that result from the arthritis. Most children with arthritis need a blend of treatments – some treatments include drugs, and others do not.

How Can You Help Your Child Live Well With Juvenile Arthritis?

Juvenile arthritis affects the whole family. It can strain your child’s ability to take part in social and after-school activities, and it can make schoolwork more difficult. Family members can help the child both physically and emotionally by doing the following:
  • Get the best care possible.
  • Learn as much as you can about your child’s disease and its treatment.
  • Consider joining a support group.
  • Treat your child as normally as possible.
  • Encourage exercise and physical therapy for your child.
  • Work closely with your child’s school.
  • Talk with your child.
  • Work with therapists or social workers.
Be brave,
kat

5 comments:

  1. Thanks for sharing this Kat. This is really sad, children having arthritis is really painful. I hope we can find ways to elevate the pain that children feels when they that juvenile arthritis. I don't even want to read the negative and hurtful edusson testimonials about this, it's frustrating.

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  3. Prevention is better than cure and you have tried to spread awareness on this issue in a better manner and keep going and share such awareness about various problems that we may face. Best regards from admission essay

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  5. We have to think one step ahead always and similar is the case of our health and we should take due care, precaution and prevention about various problems that we may face in the near future. Great awareness that is being shared over here

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